Hearing Aids and Cognitive Function

Hearing Aids and Cognitive Function

This excerpt is from Audiology.org. Click the link to read the rest of the article and more like it!

The relationship between hearing loss and cognitive status has long been recognized with significant work in the early 1980s. Nonetheless, the complexity of hearing loss, the complexity of cognitive function, and predominance cross-sectional work has limited ability to confirm or deny a causal relationship. If a relationship exists, causal or not, it is plausible that treatment of hearing loss may reduce risk or mitigate evidence of cognitive decline with age.

The participants completed measures of cognitive function (Mini Mental State Examination, CogState Cognitive Battery, and, Groton Maze Learning Test, and more), speech perception, quality of life, physical activity, loneliness, isolation, and more prior to fit and 18 months post fitting of hearing aids.

Despite the small sample size, lack of control group, and potential confounds, the authors showed statistically significant improvement in some measures of cognitive function with 18 months of hearing aid use.  Further data collection, comparison to a matched control group, and adjustment of confounding variables will be necessary to determine the application of hearing aids in mitigating risk for cognitive decline.

This excerpt is from Audiology.org. Click the link to read the rest of the article and more like it!